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Perdue celebrates 50 years of legendary brand

It was 50 years ago that Perdue purchased its Salisbury, Md. plant, kicking off a product that we now know as the number one fresh chicken brand in the nation.

After renovating its newly-acquired Route 50 facility in 1967, the company processed its first PERDUE® branded chicken right here in Maryland. Perdue’s successful venture officially disrupted the chicken industry, and today has continued that tradition by eliminating antibiotics, advancing animal welfare, and increasing organic production. The family-owned company, now in its third generation, will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2020.

Maryland Commerce Secretary Mike Gill joined Perdue representatives and Salisbury Mayor Jake Day earlier this month to commemorate the occasion, and celebrate the company’s economic impact in Maryland and success as the country’s fourth-largest poultry company.

Perdue Salisbury 50th Anniversary
Maryland Commerce Secretary Mike Gill and Chairman Jim Perdue. Photo courtesy of Perdue.

“With a strong commitment to quality and customer service, Perdue is one of Maryland’s most valued corporate partners, and we thank them for continuing to invest in our state,” said Secretary Mike Gill.

“Perdue Farms has a long and proud history with the Eastern Shore and the State of Maryland,” Governor Larry Hogan said in a statement. “Our administration recognizes the importance of this iconic, family-owned business to Maryland’s economy, and I am proud to congratulate the Perdue family on the 50th anniversary of PERDUE® branded chicken.”

Also honored at the event were a number of employees celebrating more than 40 years at the Salisbury plant. Together, the workers total more than 300 years of service in Wicomico County.

Perdue Salisbury 50th Anniversary
Perdue Farms celebrates the contributions of the associates working at the Salisbury, Md., plant, where the brand started. From left to right are Curtis Jones, Laverne Garrison, Cheryl Ballard, Lorenzo Beach, Diane Jenkins and Andre Jones. Photo courtesy of Perdue.

“The Salisbury plant is successful because of the experience of our associates,” said chairman Jim Perdue. “So many people have made a tremendous impact on the growth of our brand and success of our company.”

As the city’s largest employer, Perdue is committed to the Salisbury community and the entire Eastern Shore. Just this month, the Perdue Foundation donated $20,000 to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and earlier this year the foundation funded an early learning center in Berlin and presented a record amount to the United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore, with help from Perdue associates.

Learn more about the company and its responsibility to food and agriculture at perduefarms.com.

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Amanda Winters

Amanda Winters